*Fordhook Acorn
  • A winter and summer squash 
  • Average weight 2 pounds
  • Dated back to 1890

*Photos courtesy of Seed Savers Exchange.
​Use the links below to read about each variety.

Why We Raise Winter Squash

In the middle of winter there's nothing better than selecting a nutritious butternut, acorn or hubbard squash to cook-up for our family dinner.  From late fall, through Thanksgiving and into late winter you can enjoy the taste, aroma's and nutrition of our specially chosen squash varieties.  We select and grow squash varieties that are proven to last 3 - 6 months and perhaps longer under proper conditions. It's the natural way of providing your family with vitamins A, C, B6, minerals and more including Omega-3 fats.  

We raise our winter squash and all heirloom vegetables without pesticides or herbicides and our seeds are never genetically modified.  We've been doing it this way since 1799, we don't see any good reason to change now! 

*Waltham Butternut
  • Great for Baking, Roasting and More.
  • Average weight 3 - 6 pounds
  • Dated back to 1970
*Golden Hubbard
  • Keeps well into late winter
  • Average weight 8 - 12 pounds
  • Dated back to 1898
*PA Dutch Crookneck
  • Keeps well into late winter
  • Dark Sweet Flesh 
  • Long, Curved Neck

Your 2016 Squash Line-Up

More Details Coming On Our:

  • Concord Grapes
  • Pears
  • Potatoes
  • Sweet Corn
*Anna Schwartz Hubbard
  • Keeps well into late winter
  • Average weight 8 - 12 pounds
  • Dated back to 1898
Read & Contact

Pleasant View Farm

Useful Links

Copyright © 2016 -  Pleasant View Farm

​*​All images provided are the copyright protected property of Seed Savers Exchange (SSE). "Photo courtesy of Seed Savers Exchange." 

About our Seeds and Soil

We purchase all of our seeds from the Seed Savers Exchange. They're known for working through a large network of independent growers to "Save America's Heirloom Seeds".  Because we're committed to providing your family food that's genetically pure, we'll only purchase seeds from sources with long and proven history of success in this regard.

Since our ancestors settled this land in 1799 we've never applied pesticides or herbicides to our crops or soil.  We continue that tradition today. We raise our winter squash and all heirloom vegetables without pesticides or herbicides and our seeds are never genetically modified. We've been doing it this way since 1799, we don't see any good reason to change now!